Author Topic: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique  (Read 604 times)

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Conan117117

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Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« on: September 03, 2017, 08:56:13 PM »
Hello this might be a noob question but here it is ::). What is the standard (or the best way) of making a flap for a magazine pouch using 2 layers of cordura? Do you stitch wrong sides out, flip it right side out, then top stitch around the perimeter? Or is do you fold the raw edges, fold the material length wise in half and then just sew around the perimeter?

TwoWayTrauma

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Re: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2017, 09:47:41 PM »
Good question. I trace the outline on the wrong side of the fabric with chalk, and cut a generous seam allowance. I cut another piece the same shape, and sew just inside the chalk with the wrong sides out. I usually leave a half inch unsewn at the bottom edge to fold in.

I then trim the seam to about a 3/8 inch, and cut the radius off the corners. I then fold it right side out, push out the corners, roll the edge, and told the bottom in.

Then I top stitch very close to the edge. Rolling with the fingers helps.

You can see an example of rolling and top stitching of you skip to about 3:22 in the video below. It's a dump pouch, not a flap, but the technique is similar.


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stimpy

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Re: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« Reply #2 on: September 04, 2017, 12:33:11 AM »
http://gearmaker.org/index.php?topic=421.0

There are a lot of tutorials. One of them is the pouch flap.

Gear Dynamics

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Re: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« Reply #3 on: September 04, 2017, 12:26:03 PM »
Best/cleanest method I've found:

- Cut two equal size rectangles
- Sew together insideout. I use 3/8" SA.
- Trim any angles correctly, so they turn out properly
- Flip right side out and push out corners. I use corner pushing tool for this.

After that, I insert plastic mesh for added rigidity, using a premade LDPE jig. This REALLY helps create clean edges. As a rule, the jig and any insert you use should be 1/4" narrower (1/8" on each side) than the space you left between your stitch lines, to allow for some fitting room. For example, a 4" wide piece of raw material sewn with 3/8" SA on each side will leave you 3-1/4" space. A 3" wide insert would be used, making a finished pouch flap that is approx 3" wide. I've found that insideout seams eat up about 1/8", maybe slightly less with thinner material.

Once everything is flattened and the insert is in place, we top stitch, using a magnetic guide and a zipper foot, to keep the line perfect and consistent.



Finished Product
« Last Edit: September 04, 2017, 12:35:02 PM by Gear Dynamics »

Conan117117

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Re: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« Reply #4 on: September 04, 2017, 01:49:35 PM »
Thanks everyone for their replies. Is the corner pushing tool just a simple wooden dowel rod or is it some kind of special tool I don't know about? Also Gear Dynamics, is it possible for you to post a picture of the LDPE jig? I can't imagine what it would look like.

StonePhotoGear

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Re: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« Reply #5 on: September 05, 2017, 10:24:37 AM »
Best/cleanest method I've found:

- Cut two equal size rectangles
- Sew together insideout. I use 3/8" SA.
- Trim any angles correctly, so they turn out properly
- Flip right side out and push out corners. I use corner pushing tool for this.

After that, I insert plastic mesh for added rigidity, using a premade LDPE jig. This REALLY helps create clean edges. As a rule, the jig and any insert you use should be 1/4" narrower (1/8" on each side) than the space you left between your stitch lines, to allow for some fitting room. For example, a 4" wide piece of raw material sewn with 3/8" SA on each side will leave you 3-1/4" space. A 3" wide insert would be used, making a finished pouch flap that is approx 3" wide. I've found that insideout seams eat up about 1/8", maybe slightly less with thinner material.

Once everything is flattened and the insert is in place, we top stitch, using a magnetic guide and a zipper foot, to keep the line perfect and consistent.

(pics removed in reply to make it easier to read)

You, sir, have inspired me to use less binding tape, and really "up" my game when building my own products! IMO, top stitching looks so much cleaner than bound edges, I feel it also aids in producing a more professional looking product for the customer. My gosh, those pouches are so clean! Anyway you could do a little tutorial video to show off yer skills ;D?

cheers,
Dan

Gear Dynamics

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Re: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« Reply #6 on: September 05, 2017, 10:32:37 AM »
Thanks. I've got a few pouch orders to do, so I'll make a point of snapping some photos of my method and put a little tutorial together.

Gear Dynamics

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Re: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2017, 02:02:52 PM »
Alright, sorry for the slow response to this. Here's my method of making pouch flaps:

1. Cut your material and sew wrong sides together with whatever SA you like and whatever shape you like. Just remember to clip corners to allow angles to turn out cleanly.



2. Turn right side out and push out corners. For pouch flaps I usually do this fairly quickly with a piece of dowelling that has been rounded off. Manipulating the finished corner in your fingers does help make them look crisp. You can see my other corner tool that I tend to use in stubborn areas. Be careful not to stab right through the corner!



3. I then use a plastic insert/jig to flatten out the flap and force out the seams. Once it's inserted, it helps to drag it across a blunt table edge to really crease the edges.





4. I use a plastic mesh inside flaps to help give them some body. This is easily inserted while the jig is still in place, then the jig can be slid out. Still looking for a better option to the mesh, but its good for now. You could omit this step as long as you really make sure the edges are creased with the jig. My mesh does help keep the pouch flat while sewing the top stitch.



5. For a real clean run of stitching, I use a zipper foot and a magnetic guide. This makes the top stitch a breeze. After that, sew on your PALS, Velcro, labels etc.

« Last Edit: September 18, 2017, 02:06:43 PM by Gear Dynamics »

Gear Dynamics

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Re: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2017, 07:50:04 PM »
Finished Double 556 Pouches in M81 Woodland

« Last Edit: September 18, 2017, 07:53:38 PM by Gear Dynamics »

sssss

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Re: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« Reply #9 on: September 19, 2017, 09:30:51 AM »
Beautiful work, Gear Dynamics! That's also the largest magnetic guide I've ever seen. Did you make that?

Also, just in case people don't know about them, we often use edge guide feet for topstitching. They have a guide right in the foot itself that you you butt against the edge of the fabric. Like this:
http://www.cutexsewingsupplies.com/walking-foot-edge-guide-topstitch-3-size-foot-set-111w
or this:
http://www.citysewing.com/juki-dnu-1541-walking-foot-3-sets-with-edge-guide/
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Gear Dynamics

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Re: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« Reply #10 on: September 19, 2017, 11:08:38 AM »
Thanks! No the guides are Sailrite ones I think. They are pretty good, but will move if you aren't paying attention and you're pushing on them too hard. They also have little silicon pads over the magnets, which do come off and need to be glued back on. I have a few of these guides and they are invaluable. I like how quick they are to add of remove, especially if your work has other things projecting out that prevent the use of a guide, like a panel with buckles.

These feet with guides are intriguing. How do they work? Can they ride over things if needed?

StonePhotoGear

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Re: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« Reply #11 on: September 19, 2017, 10:05:50 PM »
Thanks GD!

I was playing around with turning and top stitching today, unfortunately I still need some practice, but I'll get there :)!
Great idea with the plastic mesh, I like it! Lightweight, but still gives it structure and form.

Now to keep practicing, I've got a (growing) bucket full of scrap cutoff pieces, these should work great for practice

thanks again for the AWESOME tutorial

-Dan

sssss

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Re: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2017, 06:33:13 AM »
The edge guide feet are awesome. They'll ride over pretty much anything the foot will ride over. The guide itself is spring loaded, so it can be pushed up independently of the rest of the foot if there's a thickness difference. The guide is also angled or ramped so that it doesn't just butt into things. I'm sure there's some combination of material, seams, and webbing that could throw it off, but they've been really useful to us.

Since they operate from the top of the material, you can use them to top-stitch a seam joining two large panels with oddly shaped edges. You would stitch the seam, fold back the seam allowances, flip the panels over right sides up, then top-stitch along the seam. The folded seam allowances provide the ridge or gap that the edge guid follows.

Of course, they don't make sewing automatic. You still need some control, just like with any other guide. But they help a lot.

The ones I linked were the first ones I found doing a Google search. Those aren't necessarily the best or cheapest or anything.
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Gear Dynamics

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Re: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« Reply #13 on: September 20, 2017, 09:24:16 AM »
I'm gonna need to try one. Thanks for the explaination. All I need out of a guide is to help keep a straight line when going quickly, and mostly when I need to hold a bunch of stuff together.

StonePhotoGear

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Re: Cordura Pouch Flap construction technique
« Reply #14 on: September 20, 2017, 12:06:31 PM »
I use the edge guide feet on my needle feed machine, but I'll have to pick one up for the walking foot as well! They come in different gauges(widths), such as 1/16, 1/8, etc.
Another option(more expensive, but adjustable) is a flip-down edge guide, especially for top stitching edges like on your mag pouches, which allows you to simply flip it up and out of the way, no need to use the attachment screws on the bed of the machine. Something like this:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/KG-867-guide-for-Durkopp-Adler-69-205-267-Pfaff-335-1245-Consew-Cobra-more-/252204937725

Ebay is the cheapest source I've found for supplementary feet, much cheaper(about 1/2) than my local pro shops charge for a simple foot set.

-Dan