Author Topic: mixing camo  (Read 317 times)

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thewolf

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mixing camo
« on: October 29, 2017, 08:23:27 AM »
Hey fellas,

Have any of you guys built any gear using either left-over material or just mixing/matching camo patterns? I have some odd size multicam, brookwood, tiger stripe, m81, and was thinking of making a Frankenstein rig out of it...essentially piecing together the different shapes into a workable size of material and building from there.

Has anyone ever asked you to make a franken rig before? Do you think it would cut cost to build one this way? It might be annoying to sew together a bunch of odd size pieces.

WPJ

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Re: mixing camo
« Reply #1 on: October 29, 2017, 08:53:25 AM »
I thought think BOGear used to do this with his packs.


GoBliNuke

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Re: mixing camo
« Reply #2 on: October 29, 2017, 10:00:27 AM »

thewolf

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Re: mixing camo
« Reply #3 on: October 29, 2017, 11:20:25 AM »
HAHA

I totally forgot about that chest rig...awesome. When I have a little more time I'm going to sew one up.

This should be a board challenge of some sort.

TuffPossumGear

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Re: mixing camo
« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2017, 11:26:04 AM »
Not necessarily in making gear, but I like to use/wear Kryptek Highlander and standard MultiCam together.

BergspitzeCustoms

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Re: mixing camo
« Reply #5 on: October 29, 2017, 04:24:19 PM »
Cotopaxi, a hipster outdoor coat/bag company local to me, has a series of "del dia" products, where the sewers use all the scraps, so color combos are always random.  Guided their executives on a fly fishing trip a few months ago and they gave me one.  Some of the color combos were more pleasant than others, but I like the pieced together look.  But they're all solid colors.  I'm not sure I'd like the same in camo patterns, but I can't say I've ever seen it.

WBTactical

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Re: mixing camo
« Reply #6 on: October 30, 2017, 07:11:11 PM »
Go for it, I had seen people do that for cloth before so why not on gear?

BOgear

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Re: mixing camo
« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2017, 08:10:35 PM »
Yup, have done maaaaaany times! Customers love the random nature of the packs. Every single one is 100% unique.

Its a false economy to think that you are saving costs by using scrap. What you save in materials is heavily offset by high labour costs due to the hand cut nature of the pattern pieces. We marketed the packs at about $50AUD more due to this alone.

For a rig for yourself, go for it. But if selling, realise it is hard to scale manufacture volume, and isn't cost effective.











BOgear: http://www.bogear.com.au   |   Blog: http://www.bogear.com.au/blog   |   Instagram/Facebook/Twitter: @bogear

stimpy

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Re: mixing camo
« Reply #8 on: November 02, 2017, 01:57:12 AM »
I always loved to see those crazy combo's pass by in my newsfeed. What have you been up to lately, since closing bogear?

BOgear

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Re: mixing camo
« Reply #9 on: November 02, 2017, 02:32:23 AM »
I always loved to see those crazy combo's pass by in my newsfeed.

Thanks mate! I honestly enjoyed every second of it all! Loved doing the patchwork ones too... basically gave the whole team free range to go nuts with colour combos. They loved it too! :)

What have you been up to lately, since closing bogear?

I've taken a bit of a break to refresh and refocus. I don't have my machines with me, so have been somewhat "forced" to just relax :D 

I have also been working with some design clients, leveraging our international manufacturing contacts, and helping the same design clients batch manufacture overseas. About to relaunch the website and showcase this new direction... but as with everything in business, it has taken ten times longer than expected!

I do plan to release some new products under a sub-brand "designed by BOgear" but that is slightly later down the track when I've got my machines out of storage so I can do prototypes and sampling. Starting to get that itchy feeling again and wanting to sew... haven't had it in a loooong time!

And to get the original post back on track, here is a "Patchwork" bag using scrap. These also look awesome but understandably are next level in labour.





BOgear: http://www.bogear.com.au   |   Blog: http://www.bogear.com.au/blog   |   Instagram/Facebook/Twitter: @bogear

BergspitzeCustoms

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Re: mixing camo
« Reply #10 on: November 02, 2017, 03:23:22 AM »
I look at those and have the same feeling as a song played in a minor key.  Something is slightly odd but I can't help but listen/look further.  Some of those wacky color combos are actually quite appealing!

Its a false economy to think that you are saving costs by using scrap. What you save in materials is heavily offset by high labour costs due to the hand cut nature of the pattern pieces. We marketed the packs at about $50AUD more due to this alone.
As someone who does everything to order, 100% custom, with very few things batch-produced, this is my standard process, so I might have to give some remnant projects a try!  Thanks for the stellar inspiration!