Author Topic: Alternative Fabrics for direct on-skin contact  (Read 421 times)

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Stone

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Alternative Fabrics for direct on-skin contact
« on: November 17, 2018, 01:25:44 PM »
Hey all,

I've been working on some ideas for products that would be strapped directly to skin(or possibly over a sock). Other makers use open foam, but I'm wondering if polar fleece would be a good option for all-day, continuous wear use.

Spacer mesh certainly has been considered, but since it is nylon, direct skin contact might be a bit abrasive(not to mention sweat buildup potential).

Thoughts/ideas would be greatly appreciated. Especially those of you who have experience with clothing/apparel.

thx,
Dan

gman

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Re: Alternative Fabrics for direct on-skin contact
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2018, 02:14:49 PM »
Fleece (Malden Mills' Polartec and others versions) has been used in the outdoor climbing community for decades. In fact, they were using it to line the inside of climbing harnesses back in the late 80s. Companies moved away from it, even on the waist belt (many rock climbers climb without shirts in warmer weather), so I assume there had to be some issues. Perhaps durability was an issue – fleece is a knit fabric.

   

@less@ndro

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Re: Alternative Fabrics for direct on-skin contact
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2018, 02:56:51 PM »
Don't forget wool! :)

essal

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Re: Alternative Fabrics for direct on-skin contact
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2018, 02:26:49 PM »
Wool is great, but I guess the selection for woven wool/nylon blends isn't exactly booming unless you work directly with a mill. Knits I assume doesn't fit into your products.
I'd guess a woven polyester that has a brushed side will be comfy enough and a good, inexpensive choice. We use it a lot in our waistbands on pants and as chinguards.

Other than that, I know a lot of people use a thin neoprene (that's polyester-neoprene-polyester laminate, like a wetsuit) for ankle holsters etc. Neoprene isn't too bad really, unless you are talking about something that covers moving joints (knees, elbows, shoulders- anyone who have surfed in a suit knows what I mean).
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Migo

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Re: Alternative Fabrics for direct on-skin contact
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2018, 11:37:45 PM »
Maybe this kind of micro-fabrics that used as lining in pockets etc.?

Corvus

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Re: Alternative Fabrics for direct on-skin contact
« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2018, 04:07:58 PM »
Fleece (Malden Mills' Polartec and others versions) has been used in the outdoor climbing community for decades. In fact, they were using it to line the inside of climbing harnesses back in the late 80s. Companies moved away from it, even on the waist belt (many rock climbers climb without shirts in warmer weather), so I assume there had to be some issues. Perhaps durability was an issue – fleece is a knit fabric.

   

Having climbed in a number of harnesses that used fleece to make them more comfortable, it does do that on a contact basis, but it is too warm to be worn directly on skin while cinched tight against the body. It will get wet from perspiration, and leave a brief clammy feeling when removed. It works well when there can be airflow either through or around it because it is loose. I don't know that this is why it isn't used as much, since closed cell foam between a woven and nylon and webbing doesn't exactly breath well either. I think that it has more to do with Arc’Teryx re-writing the book on how climbing harnesses are built and fit. After that, everyone else had to catch up with their designs.
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gman

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Re: Alternative Fabrics for direct on-skin contact
« Reply #6 on: November 28, 2018, 06:23:46 AM »
Fleece (Malden Mills' Polartec and others versions) has been used in the outdoor climbing community for decades. In fact, they were using it to line the inside of climbing harnesses back in the late 80s. Companies moved away from it, even on the waist belt (many rock climbers climb without shirts in warmer weather), so I assume there had to be some issues. Perhaps durability was an issue – fleece is a knit fabric.

   

Having climbed in a number of harnesses that used fleece to make them more comfortable, it does do that on a contact basis, but it is too warm to be worn directly on skin while cinched tight against the body. It will get wet from perspiration, and leave a brief clammy feeling when removed. It works well when there can be airflow either through or around it because it is loose. I don't know that this is why it isn't used as much, since closed cell foam between a woven and nylon and webbing doesn't exactly breath well either. I think that it has more to do with Arc’Teryx re-writing the book on how climbing harnesses are built and fit. After that, everyone else had to catch up with their designs.

Agreed. The thermo-formed Vapor (and Zrill) re-wrote the book on harness construction – and yes they were completely non-breathable!

You still climbing?

Corvus

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Re: Alternative Fabrics for direct on-skin contact
« Reply #7 on: December 10, 2018, 06:45:35 PM »
Fleece (Malden Mills' Polartec and others versions) has been used in the outdoor climbing community for decades. In fact, they were using it to line the inside of climbing harnesses back in the late 80s. Companies moved away from it, even on the waist belt (many rock climbers climb without shirts in warmer weather), so I assume there had to be some issues. Perhaps durability was an issue – fleece is a knit fabric.

   

Having climbed in a number of harnesses that used fleece to make them more comfortable, it does do that on a contact basis, but it is too warm to be worn directly on skin while cinched tight against the body. It will get wet from perspiration, and leave a brief clammy feeling when removed. It works well when there can be airflow either through or around it because it is loose. I don't know that this is why it isn't used as much, since closed cell foam between a woven and nylon and webbing doesn't exactly breath well either. I think that it has more to do with Arc’Teryx re-writing the book on how climbing harnesses are built and fit. After that, everyone else had to catch up with their designs.

Agreed. The thermo-formed Vapor (and Zrill) re-wrote the book on harness construction – and yes they were completely non-breathable!

You still climbing?

Not much these days, still spend a fair amount of time in a harness doing chairlift evac trainings, rapping out of places I shouldn't have been with skis, and running our resort rope rescue program. We have hit the gym with the little guy a few times and it has been nice to move that way again!
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