Author Topic: 120V power for 3phase machine?  (Read 681 times)

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Corvus

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120V power for 3phase machine?
« on: March 03, 2020, 03:51:07 PM »
Does anyone have any experience with either converting a 240v 3 phase machine (Brother DB2B791415) to 120v single phase? Can just the servo be swapped or will the control panel also need different parts OR is a Variable Frequency Drive the way to go? Or is there something else I should be learning about? Thanks in advance!
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Stone

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Re: 120V power for 3phase machine?
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2020, 08:58:19 PM »

frozen-stitches

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Re: 120V power for 3phase machine?
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2020, 11:02:31 AM »
Depends. If you need the functions of the control panel get a phase converter.most phase converters I have seen have a 240 input though. If you can live with out it get a servo.

Corvus

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Re: 120V power for 3phase machine?
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2020, 03:04:15 PM »
Depends. If you need the functions of the control panel get a phase converter.most phase converters I have seen have a 240 input though. If you can live with out it get a servo.

This is what I am trying to figure out. Thanks. So the control panel needs 240. I did contact Brother and they have a "transformer" but I'm not sure he understood the question:


Thank you much for contacting us with your request.
We do have a transformer to convert the machines from 110V to 220Volts.
Your machine was one of our best selling models and most of them still running in the market.
 
For this machine we don't have any motor replacement and parts are discontinued.
Our part number for this transformer is BMP301000000002ST1.
 
thank you much
 
Customer By Service Web


Hello,
I operate a sewing operation in Alaska and have the opportunity to pick up a Brother DB2-B791-415. It is set up with a 220v 3 phase motor. I am inquiring whether it is possible to simple convert the motor to 120v single phase or if the e-40 control panel and other electronics requires the 3 phase power as well. If the conversion is possible, would Brother USA be able to sell me the new servo/motor? If it is not possible to convert the motor/servo, will a VFD phase converter allow the machine to operate correctly?
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SARK9

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Re: 120V power for 3phase machine?
« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2020, 02:46:45 AM »
I've had to supply power to several of my own machines (not sewing machines) set up for 3ph power...lathes, mills, large saws..etc. I currently use a "roto-phase" type converter rated for the largest HP motor I use. This unit is powered by a normal single phase 220V input, usually available in most residential load centers. Some of the larger saws I have used in the past were supplied with "static phase converters" which are small, quiet and all electronic, but note you do take a small HP hit with either the rotary or static converters. I believe the hit is less with an actual rotary, but that is probably an academic concern with most industrial sewing machines which do fabrics. Variable frequency drives are normally used to provide a 3ph motor with some programmable or on-demand functions like speed control or reverse etc....nice if you need or will use it, but you will most likely just want the 3ph conversion to supply the main input on your machine. I'd investigate a "static phase converter" and see if you can determine if there are any gotchas which lie in wait if your main connection is ONLY the 3ph input, and the brain on your machine steps down and converts all the power and voltages for the other electronic/computerized functions.

-DC