Author Topic: Bringing a new product to market  (Read 228 times)

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thewolf

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Bringing a new product to market
« on: March 23, 2020, 07:50:50 AM »
Hey fellas - I've got a real question here - My friend and I have designed a new medical backpack and we are looking to bring it to market. Before we do so, should we get a design or utility patent? We can't manufacture the bag ourselves and would need a company to do it. How do we go about asking a company for help? If we patent the design, can we sell the design to a company for production?

Thanks for your help!

essal

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Re: Bringing a new product to market
« Reply #1 on: March 24, 2020, 08:12:50 AM »
Design and utility patents are frankly quite worthless in the textiles industry. Unless it's a worldwide patent and you have money to back up the patent, it's rarely worth it. I'd argue that social media presence and being the first is a better option.

You don't need a patent to sell a design to another company. You just need the design (typically a prototype and/or technical drawings/pattern) and someone willing to buy it for their own gain. It can be a lump sum or a royalty based deal. If you have a patent you can license the use of that patent to whoever you'd like. A patent might make it look like you're serious, but it's incredibly expensive.

If you don't have anything outside of an idea or a sketch, then you can try to get a meet with an established brand to pitch that product. If you do so, I'd have an NDA that you guys are the sole owners of whatever it is and that it's not the property of the brand you're pitching to. I'm sure you can find pitch NDAs online. In this case, the goal is to sell the design to someone else.

OEM manufacturing (ie for your own brand) is easy. Simplified: You contact a company that offers that service, send them the prototype/tech pack and wait for a sample that you can approve. Then you place the order for X amount of the product and receive the products. Pay your bills on time and I'm sure you'd be welcomed back. Several tactical companies offer OEM services for other brands with fairly small volumes. In this case, you want to have your own brand and sell your designs but without a manufacturing capacity.
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thewolf

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Re: Bringing a new product to market
« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2020, 01:45:56 PM »
Ok. So we have two prototype bags on hand and both bags have been used in an operational setting. So what it sounds like, is we need to reach out to whichever companies, pitch the design, and see if they will pick it up. I imagined it would be a little trickier than that.

Thanks for the information.

WhiskeyTwoFour

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Re: Bringing a new product to market
« Reply #3 on: March 28, 2020, 07:35:00 AM »
How much does an IP attorney cost to start, and (maybe) eventually finish the process?  There's research, drawings, technical writing, and more involved.

How much does an IP attorney cost to defend the IP?

What's your budget to defend the IP? 

Do you have a legal budget to go toe to toe with a brand owned by a multi billion dollar parent company who has a team of attorneys on payroll?

Even if you win and get a judgement to recover court costs, how will the attorney cost to enforce and collect on the judgement?

essal

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Re: Bringing a new product to market
« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2020, 11:19:54 AM »
Ok. So we have two prototype bags on hand and both bags have been used in an operational setting. So what it sounds like, is we need to reach out to whichever companies, pitch the design, and see if they will pick it up. I imagined it would be a little trickier than that.

Thanks for the information.
Well, you need to persuade them into actually buying the design off you, which is the hard part. Everyone has a medic pack, so why should they buy a design off you for an outrageous sum of money? Unless you can guarantee them sales, it's probably not something they are interested in. It's like Dragons Den but in real life, so you better have your pitch be on point, with numbers and facts.

The absolute easiest way to get a product to life is to pay someone to build it for you. You send them a prototype and they make it nice and make many of it. The only real requirement here is money, and prototypes or tech packs are very helpful but not always needed. The hardest part here is to sell your product, but there are probably more willing retailers than there are brands if you don't think you can manage to push the product yourself.

As an example, I've been helping out this dude that wants to make a uniform for his brand. He basically had 0 idea about how anything works, and after about an hour we had a plan that he had to execute and a month later he had a prototype in his hands made by a manufacturer he found. Then we went over the prototype, made comments and waited another month or so. The 2nd prototype was pretty damned good, and the 3rd was approved as far as I know. He only had a couple of uniforms as reference and some fairly crude drawings that he brought to the manufacturer in the first place. Now very soon, he'll have a uniform to sell. As I told him, a monkey with money can have anything they like produced.
Nora Tactical
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