Author Topic: Small assault pack  (Read 10803 times)

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cdhtac

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #15 on: September 01, 2015, 08:37:25 AM »
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This is what the inside looks like:

Correct me if iīm wrong, but i donīt see any kind of system for hanging a hydration bladder over there?

Gear Dynamics

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #16 on: September 01, 2015, 09:37:51 AM »
My preference as a soldier, is a padded strap. Armour or not, I'd rather my pack had more than just webbing. Having a cheaper "webbing only" option would be a good idea. Make your shoulder straps like CDH's. Good contour, good length and width for the size of the bag, and enough features to make them functional. The GTLL-100's at the bottom are my preference over side release buckles. I actually switched out the bulky quick release buckles on my Arc-Teryx Echo pack for those.

As a side note, cdhtac, every time I see those packs I'm amazed! They are works of art.

SR Tactical

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #17 on: September 01, 2015, 10:11:42 AM »
Correct me if iīm wrong, but i donīt see any kind of system for hanging a hydration bladder over there?

Correct. I like using a camelbak better bottle with a tube, because I consider it easier to clean. For a customer I would most likely include some kond of teather to hang a bladder from.
In this case here, I simply did not think about that issue because I don't need it.

cdhtac

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #18 on: September 01, 2015, 10:24:42 AM »
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As a side note, cdhtac, every time I see those packs I'm amazed! They are works of art.

Thanks man, much obliged :) Thatīs actually an old pack, wait ītill you see whatīs coming next :)

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Having a cheaper "webbing only" option would be a good idea

For a couple of combat sustainment packs that i have made to complement my own combat kit, i have actually made simple straps out of webbing, in addition to padded straps. On regular days i have used the padded straps, and with a beast mode on, webbing straps. I have never been a fan of mounting a pack directly in a bodyarmour, unless it has been done with a quick release system.

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Correct. I like using a camelbak better bottle with a tube, because I consider it easier to clean.

Roger that. Are you familiar with Sourceīs hydration bladders? I switched from CB into using Source hydration systems like 5 years ago, because those are a LOT more easy to clean and dry


WPJ

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #19 on: September 01, 2015, 10:30:27 AM »
Roger that. Are you familiar with Sourceīs hydration bladders? I switched from CB into using Source hydration systems like 5 years ago, because those are a LOT more easy to clean and dry

I love the source bladders on an extra one I tested it with water in it for a month and it still tasted fine and no gunk inside to clean out.  Absolutely no plastic or rubber taste at all with them.

SR Tactical

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #20 on: September 01, 2015, 11:00:16 AM »
I even have a source bladder here, NIB.... I need to "use up" my old Camelbak first!  ;)

Thanks a lot for the help guys, it's appreciated!

@less@ndro

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #21 on: September 01, 2015, 12:11:35 PM »
I'm not a soldier so I talk as civilian. I'm (i was!) a bike user and for mountain trekking I use a camelback bladder and everytime  I put it in the freezer. In this way I don't need to clean it.  If I forgot the bladder full of water in the backpack I wash it with some dish soap and then I freeze it. For bad taste a piece of apple in the water cover the plastic taste.  Sorry for the of topic!
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WPJ

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #22 on: September 01, 2015, 12:51:51 PM »
NP, with source there is no need for any of that, just saying

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #23 on: September 01, 2015, 10:36:24 PM »
Thanks for the pictures of the inside.  I just wanted to see the construction method used.

cdhtac, that's a pretty awesome trick with the offset webbing and the d rings.  I have been contemplating putting the strap attachments of my chest rigs on an angle instead of at 90 degrees, and now I don't have to worry about it anymore.
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die_dunkelheit

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #24 on: September 05, 2015, 12:39:32 AM »
JMA? Long time buddy... I still call those side panel pockets on packs "JMA pockets".
I also do a lot of my webbing loops like this, whenever possible actually. The only difference is that the angle I cut at is defined by the application. The other added benefit of attaching webbing points like this is that it is much more structural, the webbing is sewn in with at least twice as many stitches and it is sewn into much more fabric, so I always use this on load bearing or high stress points.

I like it! I call this type of packs "assault pods" instead of packs, because i think that name is more descriptive :)

I have one trick that i use with all my small packs with detachable shoulder straps; When it comes to the upper and lower attachment points, Instead of just folding the webbing on top of itself to form a loop, like what you did here, i fold the webbing in a V-shape; see the attached pictures; (notice that the other end of the webbing is cut straight, the other end in a 45 degree angle)

Upper attachment point


Lower attachment point


There are two reasons why i do it this way; first of all, it reduces the seam thickness, because instead of having to sew through two layers of webbing, i have to sew through only one layer.

And the second reason is more important; That V-shape puts the attachment points in a more natural angle. For example, i think that as the lower attachment point in your pack is at 90 degree angle, when you attach the shoulder straps and put some weight into the pack, it will twist the attachment point into a direction, unnatural for it, thanks to the 90 degree angle. It might also cause some extra strain for the seam (?) Also, if instead of a triglide, you use a D-ring (and the triglide is in your shoulder strap) that will help with the angle issue as well.

Same goes for the upper attachment points; unless your neck is 2 inches wide, the attachment points are forced in an unnatural angle.

Anyway, thatīs the method i use with this kind of packs...

cdhtac

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #25 on: September 05, 2015, 12:59:28 PM »
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cdhtac, that's a pretty awesome trick with the offset webbing and the d rings.  I have been contemplating putting the strap attachments of my chest rigs on an angle instead of at 90 degrees, and now I don't have to worry about it anymore.

Thanks! Yeah, discovering that method was one of those "why didnīt i think of this before"-moments :) I sometimes try to think outside the box and try come up with build methods from other projects, that i could use with backpacks.. You know how many backpacks have totally flat zippered pockets in the front panel? I have taking a habit of pleating those pockets from the top and bottom seams; that will allow the pockets to expand a bit

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I still call those side panel pockets on packs "JMA pockets".

Haha, i like that name ;D

TwoWayTrauma

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #26 on: September 08, 2015, 11:06:44 PM »
This thread inspire me to take my first shot at making an assault pack.  As with most things I make, the first one turned out a little wonkey, but I now know what I need to fix to make it great.  I've found trial and error is the best way for me to learn this.

I don't know why, but I really liked the idea of a narrow pack like that.  Probably because when I go hiking, I fill my pack to capacity, regardless of the size.  Anyway, my idea was to make something similar.  I planned it out for a pack 18 inches tall, 8 inches wide, and 6 deep.  It ended up being 7 inches deep, because I was a little generous with the seam allowance, and didn't account for the width of the zipper. 

The back is a piece of 3mm foam sandwiched between two layers of 1000 denier Cordura with some mesh on the back that I had lying around..   Everything else is single layered 1000 denier Cordura.

Things I am going to change with my next pack

1.  Probably make the entire pack out of a double layer of cordura instead of a single layer
2.  Not center the zipper in the middle of the pack, but move it to the back so I can put some PALS webbing on the sides.
3.  Do some more thinking about how I want to organize the inside of the pack. It's pretty open right now with the velcro and D-rings which can be used as tie-down points.  I will consider adding place to put a hydration bladder, and maybe some internal pockets or sleeves.  I might even throw some PALS on the inside.
4.  Correct some measuring errors that I probably should have caught the first time.
5.  Add some fastex buckles sewn into the top and the bottom to make it a compatible add on for a ruck I will build some day.
6.  Either change the bobbin thread to black or get a coyote brown zipper.
7.  Remember to put the zipper pulls on before I sew the zipper shut.
8.  Round off the top and bottom to be circular instead of square.

Anyway, here are some pics.  Thanks to all who have shared pictures and ideas, and I will be watching this post to see if there are any more good comments for shoulder straps.









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@less@ndro

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #27 on: September 09, 2015, 04:57:09 AM »
Nice job but there are some stuff to change imho. First of all my advice is to follow the tutorial made by cdh.
What I don't really like is how the zipper end is made. Another thing are the internal webbing loops, I found that if you put them not onml the sides but on the main part it is better.
on the top there are some not folded webbing!!!
I'm agree with you with what you pointed out and another little advice (but this is a taste dependent) I would make the pals with not a central column in thus way you can put 2/4 column pouches central on the pack.
Ps. And maybe I would do the low shoulder straps attachments a bit lower.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2015, 04:59:13 AM by @less@ndro »
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essal

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #28 on: September 09, 2015, 10:33:52 AM »
Yeah I would check out how Juha does his packs, especially the bottom.
In my opinion it looks like a weird design for an assault pack, all of these feel more like blown up hydration carriers which I'm not a fan of. Not to mention that when you put a little curve in your design. it's actually easier to sew it all together and the zippers will slide easier.
My personal take on designing it would be to figure out what the pack is supposed to be capable of carrying, then simply cover that in fabric...

I used a black coil 10 on most of my packs, the trick is to simply add a storm flap which will hide it. Some people will absolutely care about "mismatching" stuff, personally I don't believe that those kids have spent a single day in the field or have any idea about how Mk1 eyeballs work. My last work rig had probably 10 different colors and shades that were all visible on the outside.

TwoWayTrauma

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Re: Small assault pack
« Reply #29 on: September 09, 2015, 10:58:41 AM »
Thanks for the feedback.  Where is the CDH tutorial @less@ndro?  Essal, who is Juha?
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