Author Topic: Ultralight Carry Strap  (Read 1627 times)

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WhiskeyTwoFour

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Ultralight Carry Strap
« on: September 21, 2016, 03:34:57 PM »
Laser cut 500D/500D laminate.  1.9oz / 55g










Right Side Gear

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Re: Ultralight Carry Strap
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2016, 10:06:26 PM »
Looks good WTF!!


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essal

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Re: Ultralight Carry Strap
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2016, 11:01:06 PM »
I agree that it looks good, but I think I'd skip on it. It's (assumed) too thin and too stiff against my neck. Slings is an area where the thickness of webbing and/or padding actually is a pro.
Nora Tactical
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TangoDelta

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Re: Ultralight Carry Strap
« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2016, 11:14:06 PM »
I agree with Essal on this, the one place where I'd trade less weight for more comfort. Also, won't the edges on the broad part curl over after some time and stretching?

Apart from this I must say it looks very neat!

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flimmuur

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Re: Ultralight Carry Strap
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2016, 02:34:15 AM »
Agreed with the above, a little foam does go a long way. 
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ViktorHUN

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Re: Ultralight Carry Strap
« Reply #5 on: September 22, 2016, 04:41:28 AM »
Bit of an offtopic but I see you don't fold back the end of the webbing. I see it is melted with a lighter or so. Is that good enough for longer term please? No fraying at all?
Thank you, Viktor
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Stepan1983

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Re: Ultralight Carry Strap
« Reply #6 on: September 22, 2016, 07:08:33 AM »
What is the point of using loop buckles on the laminate ends instead of just stitching webbing directly to laminate? Is that for repairability?

WhiskeyTwoFour

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Re: Ultralight Carry Strap
« Reply #7 on: September 22, 2016, 08:50:36 AM »
I view ultralight gear as a consumable, finite service life part.  It will eventually, like a an aircraft part, wear out and need replacing.  This is one of the many trade offs with cost effective, lightweight gear.

Traditional nylon construction would be more durable, offer longer service life, and cost three times as much.  People love their cost effective trinkets.  Add more material, labor, features, benefits, etc and it becomes a $75.00 part.

Bartacking the webbing direct to laminate will be the next evolution.  In addition to cost and labor, the loops are unnecessary and are another failure point.  Injection molded hardware will fail before either the laminate or webbing.

BOgear

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Re: Ultralight Carry Strap
« Reply #8 on: September 22, 2016, 04:24:13 PM »
I agree that it looks good, but I think I'd skip on it. It's (assumed) too thin and too stiff against my neck. Slings is an area where the thickness of webbing and/or padding actually is a pro.

I have no experience with rifle slings, but from my experience with backpacks and shoulder strap designs I would disagree with you here. Too many manufacturers make shoulder straps THICK with foam. This doesn't increase surface area over the shoulder and subsequently reduce weight per unit/area. Instead it feels "cushy" and "soft" and so people think "comfy".

What I have found make stupidly good shoulder straps are thin (5mm or less) shoulder straps with a BIG surface area. Almost 120mm to 150mm wide at some points. This has a large surface area over shoulder, distributes the load, and are stupidly comfortable. Only problem is they require clever design so surface area is maximised while rubbing points is minimised. It always is a compromise to find that happy medium between width and comfort, which is why I think designers focus on thickness instead as a "comfort" factor.

All that said Essal, you have 100% more experience with rifle slings than me... I am purely looking at it from a desired outcome versus design point of view. ;)
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essal

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Re: Ultralight Carry Strap
« Reply #9 on: September 22, 2016, 04:59:05 PM »
Oh don't get me wrong here, I use 1" 55301 as my sling.. I just think that the 2 layers of 500D will have too sharp of an edge.

But what you say is correct and I agree- but slings seem to always find their way onto your neck (inside the collar) and not stay on your shoulders where you want it.
Nora Tactical
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BOgear

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Re: Ultralight Carry Strap
« Reply #10 on: September 22, 2016, 06:29:00 PM »
Oh don't get me wrong here, I use 1" 55301 as my sling.. I just think that the 2 layers of 500D will have too sharp of an edge.

But what you say is correct and I agree- but slings seem to always find their way onto your neck (inside the collar) and not stay on your shoulders where you want it.

Ah, I get you. Potential sling edge cutting into neck... Thanks for the clarification!  :)
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TwoWayTrauma

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Re: Ultralight Carry Strap
« Reply #11 on: September 22, 2016, 09:53:00 PM »
I will have to agree with BOgear here regarding the shoulder straps.  I've got a lot of experience carrying heavy loads over long distances with varying types of shoulder straps and packs.  I even have a bunch of miles under my belt with a strap that I had to use 550 cord to repair for a while.  The thick and poofy shoulder straps feel good for a few minutes.  If you are carrying your bag from your car to your office twice a day, they are fine, and they will feel better in the short term.  When you start to put serious miles in with a pack, the firmer and wider shoulder straps save your shoulders and traps by spreading the load out.

There are a bunch other examples I could use to reinforce this "what feels good for a minute will hurt you over hours" phenomenon.  I will list a few here because I have nothing better to do at the moment.

1.  Pepsi wins in the pepsi challenge when people only taste one ounce of it.  Pepsi is sweeter, and tastes better in a single sip.  However, if people drink a whole bottle or can, the sweetness can be overpowering, and that is why coke is preferred in that case.

2.  Soft car seats feel better when you test drive a car, but anyone who has driven a car cross country knows that firmer seats are much better.

3.  Gel inserts in your boots work well for walking around the office.  If you are doing a 10+ mile movement, the gell inserts will move around, the fabric will peel up, and you will mess your feet up.  Rigid and fitted insoles work better over long distances.

So, maybe that is kind of a rant, but I've done all those things and come to my own conclusions.  Having a thick and padded shoulder strap may convince someone to buy one of your packs after trying it on in a store, but people who have experience will go for the wider and rigid straps.

One of the last packs I made had 3mm foam between 500D cordura and a piece of 2 inch scuba webbing between for the shoulder strap.  If you hold it in your hand, it doesn't feel comfortable, but on the back, it works well.  The 2 inch scuba webbing helps distribute the weight over the width of the foam.  Pressure is force divided by area, and pressure is the thing that leads to pain.

For what it's worth,
Chuck
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